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Fellows

Visiting Fellows

Christine Simiyu

Christine Simiyu

csimiyu@berkeley.edu
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring, 2017)

Christine Simiyu is a Senior Lecturer at KCA University, Kenya. She holds a PhD in Development Economics from National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan, and a MSc in Statistics from the University of Nairobi, Kenya. Christine is interested on assessing the effectiveness of health and education interventions in Africa. During her time at UC Berkeley Christine will study the effects of reusable sanitary products provision to teenagers in rural Kenya on their school attendance. Her faculty mentor is Sandra McCoy.
Michael Mbate

Michael Mbate

michael.mbate@berkeley.edu
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring, 2017)

Michael Mbate is currently a PhD candidate in International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), UK. He holds a MSc in Economics from the Paris School of Economics, France, and a BSc in Economics and Statistics from Egerton University, Kenya. His research interest falls mainly on the application of quasi-experimental techniques to shed light on the political economy of development and public sector management in developing countries. During his stay at UC Berkeley he will be focusing on inter-governmental transfers and public service provision in Kenya. His faculty mentor is Frederico Finan, and his peer mentor is Isabelle Cohen.

Past Visiting Fellows

Dagim Belay

Dagim Belay

dagim.belay@berkeley.edu
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall, 2016)

Dagim is currently a PhD candidate of Economics at the Department of Food and Resource Economics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. He obtained MSc degree (Cand.Scient.Oecon) in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics from University of Copenhagen and has a BA degree in Economics from University of Gondar, Ethiopia. He also attended in the Msc program, Economics (Economic policy analysis) at Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. During his stay at UC Berkeley, he was interested in applying impact evaluation techniques to provide insights in health, environment, agriculture, development, and gender empowerment. His faculty mentor was Ethan Ligon, and his PhD mentor was Megan Lang in the department of Agriculture and Resource Economics.
Jayne Tusiime

Jayne Tusiime

jtusiime@berkeley.edu
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall, 2016)

Dr. Jayne Byakika-Tusiime is Head of Department and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Public Health at Busitema University Faculty of Health Sciences in Eastern Uganda. She graduated with a PhD in Epidemiology from UC Berkeley in 2010. Her research for over ten years has been in the field of HIV, particularly studying issues to do with compliance/adherence to antiretroviral medications (ARVs) among HIV infected individuals in Uganda. Jayne is also interested in Neglected Tropical Diseases. As part of her fellowship experience, Jayne designed an evaluation to test the impact of replacing dirt floors in households with solid floors on the frequency of childhood illnesses. Jayne is also developing an Impact Evaluation course to be offered at Busitema University. Her peer mentor was Zach Olson in the department of Health Policy, and her faculty mentor was Paul Gertler.
Remidius Ruhinduka

Remidius Ruhinduka

rremidius@udsm.ac.tz
EASST Short-term Visiting Researcher (Spring, 2016)

Remidius Ruhinduka is lecturer and research fellow at the Department of Economics, University of Dar es Salaam Tanzania, and holds a PhD in Environmental and Development Economics from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. His research interest falls mainly on application of experimental economics and Impact evaluation techniques to provide insights to various research problems in developing countries. Specifically, his main research work focuses on linking various experimental behaviours to actual field behaviour of economic agents including (but not limited to) the adoption of improved technologies such as farming technologies and clean energy stoves while also estimating their impacts on overall wellbeing of the agents.
Hailemariam Ayalew Tiruneh

Hailemariam Ayalew Tiruneh

hailave2000@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall, 2015)

Hailemariam Ayalew is a PhD candidate at the Economics Department in the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Ayalew obtained MSc degrees in Economic Policy Analysis from Addis Ababa University and University of Copenhagen. He is a Lecturer at Debremarkos University in Ethiopia and works part-time with the World Bank on poverty mapping. During his stay at UC Berkeley he is focusing on spatial market commodity price dispersion and land markets in Ethiopia. His faculty mentor was Elisabeth Sadoulet, and his peer mentor was Daley Kutzman in the department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
Saint Kizito Omala

Saint Kizito Omala

kizyomala@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall, 2015)

Saint Kizito Omala holds a PhD in Applied Statistics from Makerere University, Uganda. Omala works as a Senior Examinations Officer with the National Examinations Board in Uganda. He is also lecturing on Statistical Methods and Psychometrics at Makerere University School of Statistics and Planning, and at the Business School. While at UC Berkeley he is studying the impact of teacher deployment on teacher’s productivity and student achievement in Uganda. His faculty mentors were Fred Finan and Ernesto Dal Bo, and his peer mentor was David Schoenholzer in the department of Economics.
John Bosco Asiimwe

John Bosco Asiimwe

asiimweajb@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring 2015)

John Bosco Asiimwe holds a PhD in Statistics from Makerere University, Uganda. In addition to being a lecturer at Makerere University, John Bosco has worked with a number of Monitoring and Evaluation departments in various organizations as a Consultant or Data Analyst/Manager. While at Berkeley, he studied the impact of village health teams on health outcomes in Uganda. His faculty mentor was David Levine, and his peer mentor was Zach Wagner in the department of Health Services & Policy Analysis.
Fredrick Manang

Fredrick Manang

fmanang@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring 2015)

Fredrick Manang (Tanzania) finished his PhD in Economics at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS) in Japan. Fred is interested in impact evaluations of health and education interventions, and has researched on the impact of an initiative to build public health facilities in rural areas by the government of Uganda. While at Berkeley he evaluated the impact of access to health facilities in rural Ethiopia. His faculty mentor was Will Dow, and his peer mentor was Zach Olson in the department of Health Services & Policy Analysis.
Anthony Mveyange

Anthony Mveyange

amveyange@berkeley.edu
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring 2015)

Anthony Mveyange (Tanzania) completed a PhD in Economics from the University of Southern Denmark. During his time at Berkeley, Anthony a) evaluated the impact of Tanzania's 1998 mining act on regional income inequality and poverty in the country, and b) evaluated the effect of HIV/AIDS on economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa. His faculty mentor was Ted Miguel, and his peer mentor was Jen Kwok in the department of Economics.
Mahbubur Rahman

Mahbubur Rahman

mahbubur.ra@brac.net
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Fall 2014)

Mahbubur Rahman is a Senior Research Associate in BRAC's Research and Evaluation Division. He received his MSS in Economics from the University of Dhaka. While at Berkeley, he is looking to evaluate the Char Development and Settlement Project Phase IV, a multi-sector rural development project that aims to support the livelihoods of settlers in recently emerged chars (newly accreted land). His faculty mentors are Alain de Janvry and Elisabeth Sadoulet, and his peer mentor is Gregory Lane in the Agricultural and Resource Economics department.
Jinnat Ara

Jinnat Ara

jinnat.mkt@gmail.com
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Fall 2014)

Jinnat Ara is a Senior Research Associate at BRAC's Research and Evaluation Division. She obtained a Master's degree in Business Administration from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. While at Berkeley, she seeks to study how BRAC's Targeting the Ultra Poor program improves the well-being of women and households. Her faculty mentor is Erin Murphy-Graham at Berkeley's Graduate School of Education, and her peer mentor is Ceren Baysan in the Agricultural and Resource Economics department.
Vedaste Ndahindwa

Vedaste Ndahindwa

ndahindwa@nursph.org
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall 2014)

Vedaste Ndahindwa is a lecturer at the University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Public Health, and the Director the Medical Research Unit and the Coordinator of the National Health Research Committee in the Medical Research Center Division. He is a medical doctor and received his MSc in Biostatistics at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. While at Berkeley, he seeks to design an intervention to analyze how the "One Cow Per Poor Household" program in Rwanda can improve family nutrition, childhood education, and crop productivity. His faculty mentor was Paul Gertler in the Haas School of Business, and his peer mentor was Joshua Gruber in the School of Public Health.
Alebel Weldesilassie

Alebel Weldesilassie

Alebel_b@yahoo.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring 2014)

Alebel Weldesilassie is a research fellow at the Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI), a think tank that conducts policy-relevant research and advises the Government of Ethiopia on economic development. He also acts as the Director of the Poverty and Sectoral Research Directorate of the EDRI, as well as an assistant professor at the Addis Ababa University School of Economics. He obtained a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from Hohenheim University, Germany and a MSc. in Economic Policy Analysis from Addis Ababa University and BSc. in Agricultural Economics from Alemaya University. At Berkeley he took coursework on impact evaluation and behavioral economics. He is currently implementing an EASST-funded research project with Jonathan Robinson and Brian Giera at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
Reajul Chowdhury

Reajul Chowdhury

reajul.alamchy@gmail.com
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Fall 2013)

Reajul Chowdhury is a Senior Research Associate in BRAC South Sudan. He obtained a Masters of Business Administration from the University of Dhaka. While at Berkeley, he conducted research related to an impact evaluation of the Targeting the Ultra Poor program, a study that is funded through a BRAC-CEGA research grant. His faculty mentor was Ethan Ligon, and peer mentor was Elliott Collins of the Agricultural and Resource Economics department.
Marziana Mahfuz Nandita

Marziana Mahfuz Nandita

mmnandita@gmail.com
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Fall 2013)

Marziana Mahfuz Nandita is a Senior Research Associate in BRAC's Research and Evaluation Division. She obtained her Master of Science in Economics from the University of Bath. While at Berkeley, she studied the livelihood differences of tenant farmers in Bangladesh based on the differences in their tenancy contracts, access to credit and adoption of modern crop varieties based on the baseline information from the Barga Chashi Unnoyan Prokolpo (BCUP). BCUP, or the Tenant Farmer Development Programme, is a micro-finance programme specially tailored for tenant farmers and is run by BRAC with the funding from the Bangladesh Bank. Her faculty mentor was Alain de Janvry, and peer mentor was Sikandra Christian in the Agricultural and Resource Economics department.
Annet Adong

Annet Adong

annetteadong@yahoo.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall 2013)

Annet Adong is a Research Analyst in the Sectoral department at the Economic Policy Research Center (EPRC), in Uganda. She obtained her Master's degree in Development and Natural Resource Economics from the University of Life Sciences in Norway, and a Bachelors of Science degree in Agricultural Economics from Makerere University, Uganda. While at Berkeley, she looked at novel sale offers for established farm inputs in Uganda, understand what misconceptions exist and whether different sales offers impede adoption of technologies. Her faculty mentor was David Levine in the Haas School of Business and her peer mentor was Anne Karing in the department of Economics.
Samuel Oti

Samuel Oti

dr.otisamuel@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall 2013)

Samuel Oti is a Senior Program Specialist for the Food, Environment and Health (FEH) program at the International Development Research Center (IDRC). Prior to joining IDRC, he was a Senior Research Officer and epidemiologist at the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) based in Kenya. He holds a PhD in Philosophy in Public Health from the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. While at Berkeley, he studied the effectiveness of various community-based interventions at preventing or reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases in the slums of Nairobi. His faculty mentor was Will Dow, and his peer mentor was Janelle Downing in the School of Public Health.
Debalina Chakravarty

Debalina Chakravarty

debalina.c@berkeley.edu
DIL Visiting Fellow (Fall 2013)

Debalina Chakravarty was a DIL Visiting Student Researcher. She will spend the semester working with Professors Eric Brewer, Catherine Wolfram, Meredith Fowlie, and their research team on the Rural Electric Power Project (REPP) - an evaluation of solar microgrids in India. Debalina comes to DIL from Jadavpur University in India, where she is pursuing a PhD in Economics with a focus on climate change and the rebound effect. Her dissertation, entitled "Rebound Effect: Empirical Evidence from the Indian Economy", focuses on the impact of energy efficiency and climate change mitigation policies on consumer behavior in the energy sector. Debalina received her M.Phil. in Economics from Jadavpur University, and has published her work in peer reviewed books and journals.
Jeanine Condo

Jeanine Condo

jcondo@nursph.org
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring 2013)

Jeanine Condo is Director General of the Rwanda Biomedical Center. She is a co-author with CEGA affiliate Paul Gertler on a randomized evaluation of performance-based financing in health care facilities in Rwanda. While at Berkeley, she advanced her research on understanding how households with individuals living with HIV or AIDS are affected by pay-for-performance schemes. Jeanine obtained her PhD in Public Health from Tulane, and her MD from the University of Rwanda.
Amos Njuguna

Amos Njuguna

amnjuguna@usiu.ac.ke
EASST Visiting Fellow (Spring 2013)

Amos Njuguna is an Assistant Professor of Finance at the United States International University in Kenya. He obtained his PhD in Business Administration from Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa. While at Berkeley he evaluated policies that influence savings, pension and alcohol production and consumption. His faculty mentor was Will Dow.
Aisha Nansamba

Aisha Nansamba

nansamba.aisha@gmail.com
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Spring 2013)

Aisha Nansamba is a Senior Research Associate with BRAC Uganda. She obtained her Masters in Population and Reproductive Health from Makerere University. While at Berkeley she studied the impact of Community Health Promoter (CHP) interventions on maternal and child health outcomes; as well as designed a research study to promote a health savings culture among the poor. Her faculty mentors were Jack Colford and Ben Arnold and her peer mentor was Jade Benjamin-Chung in the School of Public Health.
Sakiba Tasneem

Sakiba Tasneem

sakibatasneem@yahoo.com
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Spring 2013)

Sakiba Tasneem is a Senior Research Associate in BRAC's Research and Evaluation Division. She obtained her Masters in Economics from the University of Dhaka. While at Berkeley she began a study on a community-based health worker program that was funded through a BRAC-CEGA research grant. Her faculty mentors were Ernesto Dal Bo and Fred Finan.
Constantine Manda

Constantine Manda

constantinemanda@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall 2012)

Constantine Manda is currently pursuing a PhD in Political Economy at Yale University. Previously, he was a Senior Research Analyst at Twaweza, where he managed randomized controlled trials in education. He obtained his Master’s degree in Public Policy, with a focus in economics, from the University of Chicago. While at Berkeley, he was interested in exploring behavior change interventions in public health. His faculty mentor was Ted Miguel, and his peer mentor was PhD student Angeli Kirk in the department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
Fitsum Mulugeta

Fitsum Mulugeta

fitsumz@gmail.com
EASST Visiting Fellow (Fall 2012)

Fitsum Mulugeta is a Junior Research Fellow at the Ethiopian Economics Association and Ethiopian Economic Policy Research Institute, and he obtained his Master's degree in Economics from Addis Ababa University. As an EASST Visiting Fellow, he proposed to investigate higher education policy in Ethiopia and interventions to improve education quality. His faculty mentor was Jeremy Magruder, and his peer mentor was Pierre Bachas in the department of Economics.
Proloy Barua

Proloy Barua

proloy.b@brac.net
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Fall 2012)

Proloy Barua is a Senior Research Associate at BRAC Uganda. He originally joined BRAC Bangladesh, and has also worked at BRAC's offices in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Tanzania, and Southern Sudan. His faculty mentor was Ethan Ligon, and peer mentor was Elliott Collins of the Agricultural and Resource Economics department. While at Berkeley, he was interested in designing a research study that looked at the impact of BRAC's Microfinance Multiplied approach- a combination of agriculture and microfinance. He acquired his Master's degree in Agricultural Economics from Bangladesh Agricultural University.
Narayan Das

Narayan Das

narayancd@berkeley.edu
BRAC-CEGA Visiting Fellow (Fall 2012)

Narayan Das is a Research Fellow at BRAC and originally joined the research division in 2007. He obtained his Master of Economics from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, and is formally enrolled in PhD-level courses within ARE at this time. His research interests include extreme poverty, microfinance, international trade, and agriculture. His faculty mentors were Alain de Janvry and Betty Sadoulet, and his peer mentor was Daley Kutzman in the department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Graduate Student Fellows

Eleanor Wiseman

Eleanor Wiseman

ewiseman@berkeley.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2016)

Eleanor Wiseman is a PhD student in Agriculture and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research interests are in development economics with a focus on technology adoption, information and political economy. Prior to joining U.C. Berkeley, Eleanor earned her MA in International and Development Economics from Yale University and worked at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab.
Elizabeth Ramiriez Ritchie

Elizabeth Ramiriez Ritchie

elizabeth.ramirez@berkeley.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2016)

Elizabeth Ramirez Ritchie is a PhD Student in Agriculture and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research interests lie in the fields of development, labor economics and political economy. She is currently studying the impact of online job portals on firms' ability to screen workers in India. Prior to starting at Berkeley, Elizabeth earned a BA in Mathematical Economic Analysis from Rice University.
Erin Kelley

Erin Kelley

erinmkelley@berkeley.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2016)

Erin Kelley is a PhD student in Agriculture and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research is in development economics, with a focus on agriculture and labor. She is currently working on a field experiment in India, trying to determine the impact of job portals and skill assessments on a variety firm and job-seeker outcomes. Prior to studying at Berkeley, Erin earned her MA in Economics from Cornell University.
Derek Wolfson

Derek Wolfson

derekwolfson@berkeley.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2016)

Derek Wolfson is a Ph.D. Student at the UC Berkeley Agricultural and Resource Economics department. His research interests include understanding how behavioral interventions can lead to increased energy efficiency and conservation in the U.S. and abroad. He is also interested in research on the regulatory frameworks surrounding net generation and the barriers to grid expansion in developing countries. Broadly, he works in the fields of industrial organization and environmental, energy, development and behavioral economics. Prior to joining UC Berkeley, Derek worked at Innovations for Poverty Action.
Juan Pablo Atal

Juan Pablo Atal

ataljp@econ.upenn.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

Juan Pablo Atal is an applied microeconomist whose research focuses on different aspects of health economics. He studies health insurance, productivity in health care delivery, and the pharmaceutical market. Prior to earning his PhD in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley, Juan Pablo graduated with a Bs. in Industrial Engineering and an M.A. in Economics from Universidad de Chile, and worked as a research assistant at the Inter-American Development Bank. This fall, he will join the Department of Economics at the University of Pennsylvania.
Felipe Gonzalez

Felipe Gonzalez

fagonza4@gmail.com
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016); Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2014)

Felipe Gonzalez is a PhD student in the Economics department at UC Berkeley. He is interested in historical and political factors that undermine development. He is currently working on the real effects of political connections during Chile's transition to democracy, and on the short and long-run effects of immigration policies. Before starting the doctoral program at Berkeley, Felipe worked as a research associate at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, where he got his Master's degree in Economics.
Juliana Londono-Velez

Juliana Londono-Velez

j.londonovelez@gmail.com
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016); Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2015)

Juliana is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research interests include income inequality, redistributive policies, and education. She is currently doing research on the interaction between socio-economic diversity, perceptions of social justice, and political preferences in Colombia. Prior to studying at Berkeley, Juliana earned a BA in Economics from the University of Los Andes, and a MA in Quantitative Economics from the Paris School of Economics.
Anne Karing

Anne Karing

akaring@econ.berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016); Behavioral Health (BeHe) Microgrant (2015)

Anne Karing is a PhD candidate in the Economics Department at UC Berkeley. Her research is in development and behavioral economics, with a focus on social influence. She is currently working on field experiments in Sierra Leone and Kenya where she is looking at the role of social signaling in individuals’ decision to contribute to public goods. Prior to Berkeley, Anne worked with Innovations for Poverty Action and the Centre for the Study of African Economies in Kenya, Sierra Leone and Uganda. Anne holds a B.A. and M.Phil. in Economics from the University of Oxford.
Jose Ignacio Cuesta

Jose Ignacio Cuesta

ignaciocuesta@gmail.com
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

José Ignacio is a doctoral student at the Department of Economics of the University of Chicago. His main research interests are industrial organization and public economics. He is currently working on research projects related to the industrial organization of health and educational markets. He holds a B.A. and M.A. degree in economics from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.
Christina Brown

Christina Brown

christinabrown@berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

Christina is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. She has worked on research throughout Africa and Asia and conducted fieldwork in Tanzania, Indonesia and Pakistan as a consultant for the World Bank and Save the Children. She is interested in the interaction between human capital development and poverty. Christina has a MALD from the Fletcher School at Tufts, concentrating in development economics, and a BA from UCLA in Physics & Political Science. Prior to working in development she taught AP Physics & Biology in a low-income school outside Boston.
David Schonholzer

David Schonholzer

david.s@econ.berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

David Schönholzer is a fourth-year PhD candidate in the Department of Economics at UC Berkeley. His research uses tools from applied microeconomics and political economy to study issues in development, public finance and economic history. He is interested in the causes and consequences of efficient public goods provision by firms and governments. Before attending UC Berkeley, he earned graduate degrees in statistics from ETH Zurich and in economics from University College London, and a BA in social sciences from the University of Zurich. He was born and raised in Switzerland.
Kaushik Krishnan

Kaushik Krishnan

krishnan@berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

Kaushik is a PhD candidate in economics at UC Berkeley, prior to which he studied law in India and then at UC Berkeley. His research focuses on labour economics. Kaushik is currently in India working on a series of projects on personnel economics, the long term impacts of factory openings on labour supply, and the causes of delays in Indian courts.
Pablo Muñoz Henríquez

Pablo Muñoz Henríquez

pablomh@berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

Pablo is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. His interests include labor markets, economic history and political economy. He is currently doing research on the consequences of dictatorship and democratization on local government and public good provision. Before studying at Berkeley, Pablo earned a BA in Economics and a MA in Applied Economics from the University of Chile.
Sam Leone

Sam Leone

leone@berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

Sam Leone is a PhD student at U.C. Berkeley and an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. His research interests lie at the intersection of behavioral, development, and political economics. He is currently working on a field experiment in Tunisia to test whether face-to-face interaction with parliamentarians increases citizens’ support for democracy, as well as a laboratory experiment aimed at understanding social media’s role in the Arab Spring. He is also involved with a number of projects in eastern Congo under Dr. Raul Sanchez de la Sierra, including one on how armed groups decide to rule the villages they conquer. Sam studied economics and Arabic at Boston University, completed a Fulbright Scholarship to Morocco, and was a neuroeconomics researcher in Zurich.
Francis Wong

Francis Wong

wf@berkeley.edu
Development Economics Research Challenge Grant (May 2016)

Francis is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. His research interests include informal taxation, informal local public goods provision, and tax policy in environments characterized by low fiscal capacity. Before studying at UC Berkeley, Francis was a Morehead-Cain Scholar at UNC Chapel Hill, where he completed a B.S. in Mathematics and a B.A. in Economics.
Laura Boudreau

Laura Boudreau

lboudreau@berkeley.edu
Behavioral Health (BeHe) Microgrant

Laura Boudreau is a PhD student in Business and Public Policy at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business, where her research interests include public and private sector institutions, labor markets, and broader political economy questions in developing countries. Her current research focuses on non-monetary aspects of working conditions (e.g., safety and health conditions) in the garment sector in Bangladesh. This research includes a field experiment that provides garment workers with information about working conditions at different factories. Prior to beginning her PhD at Berkeley, Laura was a staff member in The World Bank’s Financial and Private Sector Development Vice Presidency, where she spent three years. Laura graduated from the University of Pennsylvania summa cum laude with a B.S. in Economics and a Minor in French Studies.
Jennifer Kwok

Jennifer Kwok

jenkwok@econ.berkeley.edu
Behavioral Health (BeHe) Microgrant

Jen is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research focuses on health economics, including topics related to the provider-patient relationship and health insurance. She is currently working on a project that investigates how continuity in the provider-patient relationship influences patient health-related behavior and outcomes. Before studying at UC Berkeley, Jen earned Bachelor of Science degrees in Chemical-Biological Engineering and Biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and worked as a research professional at the University of Chicago.
John Loeser

John Loeser

john.a.loeser@berkeley.edu
Behavioral Health (BeHe) Microgrant

John Loeser is a PhD Student in Agriculture and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. His research is in development economics, with focuses on agriculture, education, and health. He is currently working on a field experiment in Rwanda studying adoption of prosthetic and orthotic technologies by persons with disabilties and research in Ethiopia on the effects of road construction on farmers. Prior to Berkeley, John was a Math Education Volunteer in Peace Corps Rwanda. John holds a B.S. in Mathematics from Brown University.
Zachary Olson

Zachary Olson

zolson@berkeley.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2015)

Zachary is a PhD student in Health Services and Policy Analysis with a concentration in Economics at UC Berkeley. His research primarily focuses on the impact that conditional cash transfer programs have on health. He is currently working with the Collective Health Institute in Salvador, Brazil, where he is interested in measuring the extent to which including conditionality improves program performance in Bolsa Familia. Before beginning his studies at UC Berkeley, Zach earned a BA in International Relations at Connecticut College and an MA in International Development from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. His fellowship is generously supported by the Levin Family.
Fiona Wilkes

Fiona Wilkes

fiona.wilkes@berkeley.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2015)

Fiona Wilkes is a PhD student at University of California, Berkeley in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, and also a Graduate Student Researcher at the UC Energy Institute. Her research interests lie at the intersection of development and environmental economics; her current work focuses on energy, infrastructure, and social networks.
Louis Preonas

Louis Preonas

lpreonas@gmail.com
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2015)

Louis Preonas is a PhD student at University of California, Berkeley in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, and also a Graduate Student Researcher at the UC Energy Institute. His research interests include U.S. fossil fuel markets, firm behavior in response to environmental policy, and energy/environmental policies in the developing world.
Manaswini Rao

Manaswini Rao

manaswini.rao@gmail.com
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2015)

Manaswini Rao is a PhD Student at University of California, Berkeley in the Department of Agricultural Resource Economics. She has many years of experience in the field of impact evaluation and managing randomized experiments in India. Her research interests include development economics, social networks, political economy and institutions.
Manuel Barron

Manuel Barron

manuel.barron@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2013 and 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Manuel Barron is a CEGA Visiting Affiliate. He received his PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from UC Berkeley and currently is a lecturer in the Department of Economics at UC Santa Cruz. His main field of research is energy consumption in the developing world; more specifically, he studies the adoption of electricity and its impact on indoor air pollution and socio-economic outcomes. As part of his research agenda, with funding from the Behavioral Sensing Grant, he is working with Nick Lam and Ajay Pillarisetti to develop sensors that improve estimates of exposure to indoor air pollution.
Francisco Munoz

Francisco Munoz

fmunoz@stanford.edu
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2014)

Francisco Muñoz is a PhD student in economics at Stanford University. His primarily research interests are development economics, finance, and social networks. His current research focuses on the real effects of political connections by looking and Chile's transition to democracy, the impact of local corruption on lending to small businesses in Brazil, and the learning of small business to set prices based on their business network in India.
Sarah Brierley

Sarah Brierley

sabrierley@gmail.com
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2014)

Sarah Brierley is a PhD candidate in Political Science at UCLA. Her research interests include state building and political accountability in low-income democracies. In her dissertation she investigates the relationship between politicians and local bureaucrats, focusing on the case of Ghana. With colleagues from UCLA she is also researching on issues of electoral integrity and electoral mobilization in Africa. Her past and current research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the UK's Department for International Development (DFID), and the International Institute at UCLA. She holds a Bachelors degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, and a Masters in African Studies, from the University of Oxford.
Santiago Saavedra

Santiago Saavedra

santisaap@gmail.com
Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2014)

Santiago is a Phd Candidate in Economics at Stanford. His two fields of interest are development and environmental economics. Currently he has two research projects: deforestation and poverty in Brazil; and the hidden health costs and benefits of gold mining in Colombia. He has majors in Mathematics and Economics from Universidad de los Andes (Colombia).
Brian Giera

Brian Giera

bgiera@ucsc.edu
Recipient of the BRAC-CEGA Travel Grant (Fall 2013)

Brian Giera is a PhD student in Economics at UC Santa Cruz. His research interests lies in East African development, with a focus on behavioral issues amongst micro-entrepreneurs. His current research is testing for the link between habit formation and inattention to savings in Ethiopia, information diffusion concerning fertilizer adoption in Kenya, and how market imperfections can affect occupational choice in Tanzania. Prior to studying at UCSC, Brian received his BS from Oakland University (Michigan), his MA from Central Michigan University, and consulted for BRAC in Uganda.
Ceren Baysan

Ceren Baysan

cbaysan@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the BRAC-CEGA Travel Grant (Fall 2013)

Ceren Baysan is a PhD student in the Agricultural Resources and Economics department at UC Berkeley. Her research topics broadly cover rural development, household financing, risk management, and climate and violence. She is currently doing research on the interaction between formal and informal insurance mechanisms among farmers in Ghana. Recently, she has started a project in Uganda involving mobile banking and savings and credit cooperatives. She has a Bachelor of Commerce degree from McGill University after which she worked for the Centre for Microfinance in India and then as a research assistant at Yale.
Javier Rosa

Javier Rosa

javirosa@eecs.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2013 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Javier Rosa is a PhD student in Computer Science at UC Berkeley in the Technology and Infrastructure for Emerging Regions group. He is interested in applications of technology to development issues (ICT4D), particularly in rural energy and electrification. Javier earned a dual B.Sc. in Computer Science and Mathematics from Rutgers University. His work includes designing and building a metering system for rural micro-grids. He is also working on building systems to effectively integrate sensor and survey data needed by practitioners and researchers in their impact assessment efforts.
Daniel Wilson

Daniel Wilson

dlwilson@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2013 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Daniel Wilson is a Ph.D. student of mechanical engineering, National Science Foundation Fellow, and Fulbright Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Daniel’s research focuses on evaluation of the performance and impacts of fuel-efficient cookstoves in the developing world. His projects range from testing cookstove aerosol emissions, to incorporating thermoelectric generators and fan-powered forced air into cookstoves, and measuring vertical profiles of tropospheric black carbon soot using low-cost sensors flying aboard weather balloons. Currently, Daniel is working to evaluate the use and impact of the 27,000 Berkeley-Darfur Stoves that have been disseminated in Darfur, Sudan. CEGA’s Behavioral Sensing Fellowship will enable Daniel’s goals by providing the resources to deploy a cell phone based surveys and data acquisition platforms for cookstove usage sensors in Darfur.
Nicholas Lam

Nicholas Lam

nickllam@gmail.com
Recipient of the Spring 2013 and 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Nick is currently a PhD student in Environmental Health Sciences at UC Berkeley. His research interests address the relationships among household fuel use, air quality and human health. His current research focuses on measuring and modeling the contribution of household cooking and lighting in developing countries, specifically from kerosene, on human exposure, disease risk, and emissions of climate-altering air pollutants. As part of CEGA’s behavioral sensing fellowship, he will be working with colleagues from Agricultural and Resource Economics and Environmental Health Sciences to further the development of an ultrasonic locator for use in improving air pollution exposure estimates and apportioning exposure at the household level.
Ajay Pillarisetti

Ajay Pillarisetti

ajaypillarisetti@gmail.com
Recipient of the Spring 2013 and 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Ajay Pillarisetti is a fourth year doctoral student in Environmental Health Sciences. He focuses on household energy use in the developing world. Much of his current thinking involves managing, describing, and interpreting large volumes of sensor data related to stove usage. Most recently, he has been engaged with projects across India and in Nepal.
Daley Kutzman

Daley Kutzman

dkutzman@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2013 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Daley Kutzman is a PhD student at UC Berkeley in the Agricultural and Resources Economics department. Her research interests cover technology adoption, property rights, corruption and health economics. Recent work has focused on the impact of Mexican property rights reform on deforestation, and the health consequences of counterfeit/substandard anti-malarials.
Angeli Kirk

Angeli Kirk

angeli.kirk@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2013 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Angeli Kirk is a PhD student in Agricultural and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley, with a Master's in International Development from American University. Her research interests include technology adoption, agricultural innovation and sustainability, livelihood strategies, health and nutrition, HIV/AIDS, impact evaluation, measurement technology, and data quality. Current projects focus on how the source of income shocks can affect health outcomes in Uganda, and the promotion and measurement of cookstove technology adoption in Ethiopia in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs. Her field experience includes Haiti, Malawi, Kenya, Liberia, and Ethiopia.
Nicholas Obradovich

Nicholas Obradovich

nobradovich@ucsd.edu
Recipient of a 2013 Climate Change Research Challenge Grant, and a Levin Family Seed Grant, June 2014

Nicholas Obradovich is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at UCSD and a Global Change Fellow at Scripps Institute of Oceanography. His dissertation focuses on the politics and political effects of a changing climate. He is researching questions like 'How does unusual weather affect rural voting behaviors?', 'Does unusual weather affect rates of climate-related speech?', and 'Does climate change policy information alter rural voters' political opinions?' Before beginning his studies at UCSD, Nicholas worked as an economics research assistant at Stanford's Graduate School of Business and received his B.S. in Economics and Environmental Studies from Santa Clara University. Visit his personal website here: http://polisci2.ucsd.edu/nobradovich/.
Andrew Crane-Droesch

Andrew Crane-Droesch

andrewcd@berkeley.edu
Recipient of a 2013 Climate Change Research Challenge Grant

Andrew Crane-Droesch is a PhD candidate in the Energy and Resources Group at UC Berkeley. His interests center on the intersection of climate/environmental change and international development. Current projects include a randomized control trial on adoption dynamics and livelihood impacts of soil carbon sequestration technologies (biochar) among smallholder farmers in rural Western Kenya. Before beginning his doctorate, Andrew worked for the United Nations Development Program. Visit Andrew's personal website here: http://andrewcd.berkeley.edu.
Miguel de Figueiredo

Miguel de Figueiredo

mdefig@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Levin Family Seed Grant (September 2012)

Miguel de Figueiredo is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at UC Berkeley and also studied at Yale Law School. His work is broadly focused on compliance in challenging institutional and behavioral settings. His research focuses on the areas of law and development, electoral corruption, voting behavior, election law, criminal justice, and judicial decision making. His current work includes a randomized field experiment combined with survey work in Brazil designed to understand the impact of corruption information on voting behavior. He is in the process of launching a field experiment designed to shed light on citizen efforts to curb business tax evasion, and is working on another project that examines the effect of sentencing enhancements for drunk driving on recidivism. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, UC Berkeley’s Survey Research Center, and Yale Law School’s Oscar M. Ruebhausen Fund. His fellowship is generously supported by the Levin Family.
Willa Friedman

Willa Friedman

willa@econ.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2012)

Willa Friedman is a PhD Candidate in Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research spans the field of development economics, focusing on Sub-Saharan Africa. Her current research investigates the impact of availability of antiretroviral drugs on individual behavior – including risk-taking, HIV testing, and investments in the future and children - in East Africa. She is also exploring the impact of different types of monitoring systems on worker productivity, in the context of scaling  up school-based deworming programs in Kenya. Other work has looked into the impact of education on political beliefs among girls in Western Kenya, and the relationship between local economic conditions and participation in violence during the genocide in Rwandan. Before coming to Berkeley, Willa worked with the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab in Kenya. She has worked and studied in Uganda, Rwanda, Mali, Kenya, Burkina Faso, and Cambodia. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Levin family. She is also a past recipient of a Weiss Family Fellowship.
Yiwen (Eva) Cheng

Yiwen (Eva) Cheng

ycheng@econ.berkeley.edu
Recipient of a 2012 Levin Family Seed Grant

Yiwen (Eva) Cheng is a PhD Candidate in Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research primarily focuses on the topics of political economy and urbanization in China. Her current work explores how China's unique administrative organization gives rise to the country's patterns of urbanization and structural change. She is also working on a project that highlights the impact of the promotional incentives of Chinese bureaucrats on rural land conversion in China during the recent decades of economic reform. Eva holds a B.A. in Economics and Applied Math, as well as a Minor in French from UC Berkeley.
Jessica Gottlieb

Jessica Gottlieb

jgott@stanford.edu
Recipient of the 2012 E2A Research Challenge Grant

Jessica Gottlieb is a PhD Candidate at Stanford University researching democracy and government accountability in poor countries. Her current work analyzes sources of democratic failure in the West African country, Mali. To study whether low voter expectations undermine accountability, she conducted a field experiment randomly assigning a civic information intervention to 370 villages. A related paper examines the determinants of variation in public goods provision across Mali's municipalities. She is also designing a research project in Senegal to study the extent to which clientelism breeds accountability during the 2012 legislative elections. Gottlieb received an MA in Economics from Stanford in 2011 and will complete her PhD in 2013. She is a pre-doctoral fellow at the Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law for 2012-13. Her past research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the International Growth Centre and Stanford’s Global Underdevelopment Action Fund. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Tarek Ghani

Tarek Ghani

tarek_ghani@haas.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the 2012 E2A Research Challenge Grant

Tarek Ghani is a PhD student in Business and Public Policy at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business, where his research interests include the political economy of reform, the industrial organization of corruption, and empirical contracting issues. His current research projects include a randomized evaluation in Afghanistan of the impact of mobile financial transfers on firm and bureaucratic performance, including financial leakage, human capital investments, and savings and consumption behaviors. Before Berkeley, Tarek worked for three years on conflict prevention issues in the private foundation Humanity United, and held prior consultancies with the World Bank, Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Center for Global Development.  A recipient of the Truman Scholarship and the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship, Tarek graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. in Symbolic Systems and Honors in International Security. His fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Brigitte Zimmerman

Brigitte Zimmerman

bazimmer@ucsd.edu
Recipient of the 2012 E2A Research Challenge Grant, and a Levin Family Seed Grant (June 2014)

Brigitte Zimmerman is a PhD student in Political Science at UC San Diego. Her research focuses on local government accountability and public goods provision in Sub-Saharan Africa. Recent projects focus on the political economy of corruption, protest dynamics, female political representation and field experiment methods. Before her studies at UCSD, Brigitte worked in for-profit and non-profit consulting in the US, Europe and Africa. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Sinaia Urrusti-Frenk

Sinaia Urrusti-Frenk

luzmau@gmail.com
Recipient of the 2012 E2A Research Challenge Grant

Sinaia Urrusti-Frenk is a PhD student in the department of Economics at UC Berkeley in the fields of development and political economics. Her current focus is on the political economy of mass media in Mexico and the role of political coordination in the Mexican Drug War. Her past research includes the impact of inequality on poverty, the causes and consequences of migration, and the effects of conditional cash transfer programs. Before joining the graduate program at Berkeley, Sinaia received her MA in International and Development Economics from Yale University and worked for BANSEFI, the Mexican government’s development bank. She received her BSc in Economics from Tilburg University in The Netherlands. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family. She is also a past recipient of a Levin Family Seed Grant.
Zoe Cullen

Zoe Cullen

z.cullen@gmail.com
Recipient of the 2012 E2A Research Challenge Grant

Zoe is a third year doctoral candidate in the Stanford Economics Department. Her fields are in Development and Macroeconomics. Prior to Stanford, Zoe worked as a Doctoral Fellow at the RAND Corporation in the Health and Labor units. Her current research utilizes social media to study the impact of anonymity on collective action during the Arab Spring. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Eoin McGuirk

Eoin McGuirk

mcguirke@tcd.ie
CEGA Visiting Scholar / Post-Doctoral Researcher

Eoin McGuirk is a Visiting Scholar / Post-Doctoral Researcher at CEGA. Prior to this appointment, Eoin was a visiting PhD student at the Department of Economics, UC Berkeley. He received his PhD from Trinity College, Dublin, where he conducted research on natural resources and democracy in sub-Saharan Africa; the domestic political economy of foreign aid donations; democracy and trade policy; and the impact of ethnic diversity on the provision of primary education in Uganda. With CEGA, Eoin has worked on a UK parliamentary review of aid for education in East Africa, and he is currently evaluating a series of educational interventions targeting marginalized girls in Sierra Leone.
Ruth Carlitz

Ruth Carlitz

rcarlitz@ucla.edu
Recipient of the 2011 Development Research Challenge Grant

Ruth Carlitz is a PhD candidate in Political Science at UCLA. Prior to beginning her graduate studies, Ruth worked for two and a half years in Tanzania with an education policy NGO. She has also worked for the International Budget Partnership and Revenue Watch Institute, and recently conducted research commissioned by the Transparency and Accountability Initiative. Ruth's research interests include the political economy of African development, the link between transparency and local government accountability, and the impact of mobile phone technology in the developing world. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Kelly Jones

Kelly Jones

kelly.jones@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the 2011 Development Research Challenge Grant

Kelly Jones is a PhD candidate in Agricultural & Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research concerns Development Economics, in particular, issues of health and welfare in Africa. Recent works focus on how economics relates to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa, sexual and reproductive health in Ghana, and decisions regarding fertility and child rearing in Senegal. Before her studies at Berkeley, Kelly served as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Kenya, received a Masters in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins' School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and was a Junior Professional Associate at the World Bank. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Gautam Rao

Gautam Rao

grao@econ.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Levin Family Fellowship (March 2011)

Gautam Rao is a PhD candidate in Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. His research is in the fields of development, behavioral economics and labor economics. At present, he is studying an unusual natural experiment in India to learn whether having classmates from poor families changes a student's social preferences, civic attitudes and related pro-social behavior. Other projects involve (a) studying how households respond to changes in school quality, (b) identifying the role of social norms in voting behavior, and (c) identifying a pure taste for power over others, and learning whether it predicts career choice. In other lives, Gautam has been an engineer and an environmentalist. He is learning to play the clarinet, and recently mastered the old jazz standard, Three Blind Mice. His fellowship is generously supported by the Levin Family.
Gianmarco Leon

Gianmarco Leon

gianmarco@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Levin Family Seed Grant (March 2011)

Gianmarco Leon is a PhD candidate in Agricultural and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. His research focuses on political economics in developing countries and more broadly on development economics. Before moving to Berkeley, Gianmarco worked for several years at the Inter-American Development Bank, and in GRADE, a research institute in his home country, Peru. At present, he is studying voter's behavior in Peru, examining how voters react to different monetary incentives to vote and how social networks influence voting decisions. Some of his previous research focuses on understanding the persistence of civil conflict on human capital accumulation and measuring the Value of Statistical Life in Sierra Leone. Gianmarco also loves spending time at the beach, surfing and traveling; indoors he spends a lot of time in the kitchen. His fellowship is generously supported by the Levin Family.
Mitchell Hoffman

Mitchell Hoffman

hoffman@econ.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Levin Family Seed Grant (March 2011)

Mitchell Hoffman is a PhD Candidate in Economics at UC Berkeley. He is interested in worker behavior in firms, labor contracts, and voting. Before Berkeley, Mitchell earned a BA in Economics from Yale University. Currently, he is working on a project on social networks and voting. Mitchell also enjoys running and reading. His fellowship is generously sponsored by the Levin family.
Lauren Falcao

Lauren Falcao

lfalcao@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the 2011 Weiss Family Fellowship

Lauren Falcao is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. She is interested in development issues, particularly in East Africa. Lauren earned a BA in Political Science and Economics from Stanford University. Before her studies at Berkeley, Lauren served as a Junior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and as a Research Associate for the Center for Evaluation for Global Action (CEGA). Currently, she is working on a project on corruption and social preferences in Kenya. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Andrew Dustan

Andrew Dustan

adustan@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the 2011 Weiss Family Fellowship

Andrew Dustan is a PhD candidate in Agricultural and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley, focusing on development economics. His current research focuses on public high schools in Mexico City, both their quality and the determinants of students' preferences for them, and access to higher education. Prior to studying at Berkeley, Andrew received his undergraduate degree at the University of Oklahoma and his M.A. at Miami University (Ohio). Outside of research, his favorite activities are spending time with his wife and new daughter and cheering on his alma mater's athletic teams. His fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Pierre Bachas

Pierre Bachas

bachas@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the 2011 Weiss Family Fellowship

Pierre Bachas is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. His research interests lie in the fields of development economics and public finance. He is currently working on a project on corruption and social preferences in Kenya and another on estimating the effects of corruption on public goods provision in Brazil. Before his studies at Berkeley, Pierre obtained his BA and MA in Economics from the London School of Economics, and worked in Kenya on the Kenyan Life Panel Survey. Outside of academia, Pierre enjoys outdoor sports, in particular soccer and tennis. His fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Jamie McCasland

Jamie McCasland

jamiem@econ.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the 2011 Weiss Family Fellowship

Jamie McCasland is a PhD student in Economics at UC Berkeley. Within development economics, her research interests include the functioning of labor markets in Africa, gender inequality and health services access, and understanding corruption, dishonesty and trust. Her ongoing projects focus on job training in Ghana and East Africa, pan-African leadership training, and corruption and social preferences in Kenya. Before her studies at Berkeley, Jamie worked in consulting, served as a US Peace Corps volunteer in Kenya, and coordinated field implementation of large-scale randomized control trials with Innovations for Poverty Action in Kenya. Her fellowship is generously supported by the Weiss Family.
Saika Shaolin Belal

Saika Shaolin Belal

ssb@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Saika Shaolin Belal is a first-year PhD student in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE). She studies development economics. Her areas of research interest include rural labor markets, migration, public finance, institutions, and behavioral economics. She has an MPA from Cornell University, NY, and a Bachelors in Economics from the College of William and Mary, VA.
Robert On

Robert On

roberton@ischool.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Robert On has a background in EECS and Statistics and is currently a PhD candidate at the School of Information, Berkeley. His areas of research are in ICTD and Development Economics. Robert is interested in the procurement, implementation, use, and evaluation of information systems for social and economic development with the motto: Try a lot, fail a lot, but measure everything. In a previous life he was working at Google as a software engineer doing data-driven economics research.
Sara Kerosky

Sara Kerosky

skerosky@ucsd.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Sara Kerosky is PhD student in political science at UC San Diego. Her research explores government responsiveness and accountability relative to environmental problems, including climate change, disaster prevention and relief, and natural resource management. She is currently working on projects in the U.S. and in the Philippines, and has previously conducted field research in Kenya, Mexico, and Chile. Before studying political science, Sara was a researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Whale Acoustics Lab.
Estelle Chaussard

Estelle Chaussard

estelle@seismo.berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Estelle Chaussard is a Postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley (USA). Her current research focuses on the development and usage of space geodetic techniques to detect small movements of the Earth's surface in relation with natural and anthropogenic hazards (such as aquifers deformation, volcanism, and crustal faulting). Chaussard received a B.Sc in Earth Sciences (2006) and a M.Sc. in Geophysics (2008) from the University of Montpellier II (France), and a Ph.D. in Geophysics (2013) from University of Miami (USA). She was awarded the NASA Earth Space and Science Fellowship in 2011-2013.
Julien Caubel

Julien Caubel

jcaubel@berkeley.edu
Recipient of the Spring 2014 Behavioral Sensing Research Challenge

Julien Caubel is a Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley. Julien’s research focuses on clean energy technologies for developing regions and distributed sensor systems for environmental monitoring. His current projects range from low-emission cookstove design to the development of low-cost, airborne sensors to monitor atmospheric black carbon aerosol concentrations. Prior to starting the doctoral program at UC Berkeley, Julien was a Fulbright Fellow in northern Ghana, collaborating with local students and community leaders to design, construct, and implement sustainable bio-waste to energy technologies.